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Manchester Museum Book Club

June 14, 2013

Tuesday 25 June 2013, 5.30-6.30 pm

Meet people and discuss books inspired by the museum’s new Nature’s Library gallery. This month’s book is ‘The Conjuror’s Bird’ by Martin Davies.

In 1774, Captain Cook made his second expedition to the South Pacific, during which the ship’s naturalist collected samples of local flora and fauna, including a single thrush-like bird. The specimen was immortalised in a sketch and brought back to England, where it was displayed in naturalist Joseph Banks’ collection until it suddenly vanished.

Two hundred years later, researcher John Fitzgerald receives an invitation to join in the search for the bird’s remains in order to catalogue the genetic composition of lost species. It soon becomes clear that he has become involved in something more complex and dangerous, revealing details of an enigmatic woman in Banks’ life known only as ‘Miss B’. To solve the mystery, Fitzgerald must uncover her identity, which he believes may be the key to finding the elusive bird.

A gripping mystery, The Conjurer’s Bird tackles the intrigue surrounding the celebrated Joseph Banks and the legendary bird of Ulieta.

There is a great blog about the painting of the mysterious bird of Ulieta, by George Forster by the Natural History Museum. And at the NatureManchester Blog Henry Mcghie the Head of Collections and Curator of Zoology at the Manchester Museum talks about bird identification using museum specimens.

Book on: 0161 275 2648 or museum@manchester.ac.uk

Adults, Free

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