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Collecting Trees – in the News – After Hours Thursday 25 July

July 24, 2013

Trees were in the news this morning, with a report of research that UK forests are still feeling the impacts of 1976 drought

www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-23419036

At our After Hours on Thursday 25 July – 6.30-9pm, you’ll be able to find out more about some Manchester based tree research, i-trees. Artist Lucy Burscough will be responding to this work and writes

‘We all recognise the advantage of having trees in our city. We see the benefits to wildlife and the air we breathe. In the heat and dust of a city centre summer, what could be better for our well-being than sitting in the shade of a magnificent tree on a hot day? Artist Lucy Burscough invites you to help celebrate our trees and create an artistic response to the Manchester University Faculty of Life Sciences’ paper, ‘The effect of tree shade and grass on surface and globe temperatures in an urban area.’ which is part of the i-trees project.’

For the evening we are delighted to welcome two Manchester based musicians who will both be performing on wooden instruments.

At 7pm, Jali Nyonkoling Kuyateh will be performing. Jali is a Mandinka traditional storyteller or praise singer, known in West Africa as a griot. Members of the Kuyateh tribe have held this noble role throughout history and the members of the tribe are descended from the very first griot, Nyankumang Duga Kuyateh, in the Mali Empire.

Then at 8pm Sidiki Dembélé will be performing. Born in Abidjan, the commercial capital of Cote d’Ivoire, Sidiki Dembélé is the second son of a Griot family. Raised in a family whose

generations have been steeped and driven by these traditions, from the age of fourteen Sidiki has played percussion instruments professionally and in particular the Djembe drum of West Africa, to herald and celebrate significant events in the life of his community in Abidjan.

Jali Nyonkoling Kuyateh will be playing the kora and Sidiki Dembele will play the ngoni and djembe Like so many other West African instruments, these three are made from trees and other natural products.

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